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Parent-Teen Driving Contract - Why They Work. Get One Here.
Published: Sunday, November 4, 2012

By: Staff Writers

Put your family's driving rules into effect by talking with your teen and completing a written agreement that both of you can live up to. Setting clear rules around driving, and enforcing them, reduces the crash rate compared to families who do things "on the fly" or without agreed-upon guidelines.

Research confirms that parents who set rules for their teen drivers and take an active role in monitoring and managing their teen's driving enjoy far lower accident rates than those who do not. Many states across the country recommend using a written "parent-teen" agreement or contract to establish those rules.

The Safe Teen Driving Pledge is such an agreement. It asks parents and teens to formalize agreements with one another on a range of issues to promote safer driving. We encourage you to download a copy of the Pledge...to discuss it with your young driver...and then to sign and enforce the agreement.

Clear, well-defined rules and regular follow-up on the agreements you have made could spell the difference between an incident-free teen driving experience and tragedy.

Visit the Store to get your free copy.
Acrobat reader is required. Get it here


Advice from the Experts...

"Parents have the potential to reduce teen driving risks by carefully managing their teen's early driving experience. Parents are involved in their teenagers' driving from the beginning and they have the opportunities to teach teens to drive, determine when they can apply for a permit or license, govern their access to vehicles, and limit exposure.

"Unfortunately, involvement for most parents does not extend much beyond supervising practice driving. The modest initial restrictions many parents place on their newly licensed children are generally not restrictive enough to be consistent with safety." ~ Journal of Safety Research 34 (2003) 91-97










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